Galaxy cluster MACS j1149.5+223 and a supernova four times over

This image shows the huge galaxy cluster MACS J1149+2223, whose light took over 5 billion years to reach us.

The huge mass of the cluster and one of the galaxies within it is bending the light from a supernova behind them and creating four separate images of it. The light has been magnified and distorted due to gravitational lensing and as a result the images are arranged around the elliptical galaxy in a formation known as an Einstein cross.

A close-up of the Einstein cross is shown in the inset.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, S. Rodney (John Hopkins University, USA) and the FrontierSN team; T. Treu (University of California Los Angeles, USA), P. Kelly (University of California Berkeley, USA) and the GLASS team; J. Lotz (STScI) and the Frontier Fields team; M. Postman (STScI) and the CLASH team; and Z. Levay (STScI)

About the Image

Id:heic1505a
Type:Collage
Release date:5 March 2015, 20:00
Related releases:heic1505
Size:1176 x 1169 px

About the Object

Name:MACS J1149+2223
Type:Early Universe : Star : Evolutionary Stage : Supernova
Early Universe : Galaxy : Grouping : Cluster
Category:Galaxies
Stars

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Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical606 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
Y
1.05 μm Hubble Space Telescope
WFC3
Infrared
J
1.25 μm Hubble Space Telescope
WFC3
Infrared
J
1.4 μm Hubble Space Telescope
WFC3
Infrared
H
1.6 μm Hubble Space Telescope
WFC3

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